Radicchio Salad

Here’s a crisp wintery salad that is the perfect accompaniment to the Zweibelkuchen recipe. What we like best about radicchio, besides its color and its great bitter flavor is that it keeps really well in the fridge. Just plop in an ice bath to refresh, and it’s good as new. This salad is adorned with buttery green olives, salty parmesan cheese, and crunchy garlicky breadcrumbs to elevate it to out-of-this world!

Radicchio Salad Recipe

serves 4

1 head radicchio, rinsed, dried and torn into pretty chunks
¼ cup olive oil
juice of ½ a lemon
1 teaspoon Dijon mustard
¾ cup freshly grated Parmesan cheese
1 handful of green olives, hand-torn
1 clove garlic
1 pat of butter
½ cup panko

 

Make the salad dressing by either whizzing in the blender or whisking by hand: the oil, lemon, mustard. Dress the radicchio, scatter with all but a bit of the parmesan, and mix together until the radicchio is deliciously coated. Feel free to sample a leaf or two to make sure.

Heat the butter in a skillet until melted and, using a Microplane, quickly grate in a clove of garlic. Add the panko and stir until toasted. Once again, scatter all but a little bit over the salad and mix.

To serve: scatter the reserved breadcrumbs and cheese scattered on the plate, along with the olives.

Radicchio Salad Recipe


My Mom’s Zwiebelkuchen

Onion Tart Recipe

1 stick of butter
2 ½ pounds of mild onions, sliced into thin half-moons
4 eggs
6 tablespoons flour
1 cup cream (the traditional recipe uses sour cream, but we like real cream better)
1 tablespoon caraway seeds
2 teaspoons salt
¾ cup of sliced pancetta or bacon, if desired (our version is vegetarian)
1 sheet of puff pastry

 

Melt the butter in a heavy-bottomed skillet and add the onions. Cover with a tightly-fitting lid and steam gently (on low heat) for 20 minutes, stirring only occasionally. Remove the pan from heat and allow to cool with the lid on.

Preheat your oven to 375°.

Roll out puff pastry thin enough to line the bottom and edges of a half-sheet pan (18 by 13 inches) or similarly-sized square pan. Mix the eggs, cream, salt, and caraway seeds. Sift in the flour and stir gently to combine. Fold in the onions and spread the mixture evenly over the puff pastry. Sprinkle with the bacon or ham (if you’re using). Bake for approximately 30 minutes, until golden.

 


Job Opening at Hipcooks Seattle

JOB POSTING  – MANAGER, HIPCOOKS SEATTLE

Do you have Pizazz in the Kitchen? Are you the Host with the Most?
We’re on the hunt for a Hipcooks Seattle Manager who can “stand the heat!”

A Hipcooks Studio Manager creates a busy, vibrant, successful Hipcooks Studio. Duties include:

Hosting the Hipcooks Studio: Act as the liaison between Hipcooks & clientele. Managing email/phone is a near-daily activity.

Scheduling: Set the schedule for the studio, including teaching, shop/prep days, cleaning & organization. Cost-containment is a consideration: on a slow week, a manager might assume all these responsibilities, busy times will make more use of support staff.

Teaching: Teach at least 15 classes per month (depending on the season, staff availability, etc.) Count on teaching weekday evenings, plus weekend shifts. Private classes often are scheduled weekdays.

Staff management: Supervise the PT Teachers & Shop/prep staff, support their development and ensure quality. Manage the assistant pool, schedule assistants and host assistant events.

Store Management: Store shelves are maintained, and train staff on great sales procedures. Accounting activities include inventory accounting and reconciling, cash box reconciling, gathering of receipts, submitting support staff hours for payment.

You are: Responsible, committed, self-starter, & motivated. While cooking experience is not entirely necessary, love of food and people are a must. Work hours are flexible, but this is a “lifestyle” job, for those looking to integrate their passion into their life. This job is very involved — hard-working types committed to work/life integration will achieve the most job satisfaction.

More details (including salary & benefits): email monika@hipcooks.com

Monika will be at the Seattle location conduction preliminary interviews November 10 & 11, so hop to it!


Roasted acorn squash with panko

 Roasted acorn squash with panko Recipe

After Halloween, Holiday craziness seems to rush in like a freight train. We’re not ready! Ease into that Holiday Feelin’ with this recipe that takes mere minutes, but gives you the warm fuzzies for the rest of the day.

When you slice the acorn squash horizontally (against the ridges rather than with them), you get lovely scalloped edges that are as pretty as a picture.

It’s a matter of tossing those pieces in some olive oil and salt, and roasting in a hot oven until they’re soft (about 20 minutes.) We’ll often use the toaster oven since we make these in a small batch — perfect for lunch with a salad or as a side with dinner.

A little bit of crunch (and not a lot of effort) can turn ordinary roasted squash into something more special. Heat a pat of butter in a skillet, add some chopped garlic and thyme leaves and when fragrant, toss in a handful of panko. As you stir, the panko will toast and absorb those lovely flavors. Then it’s just a matter of a flick of your hand to scatter the magic and you’re done!

Acorn Squash with Panko

Acorn Squash Recipe

serves 2, as a light lunch (with salad!) or a side dish with dinner

1 acorn squash
1 tablespoon(ish) olive oil
1 tablespoon butter
1 clove garlic, chopped
a few leaves of thyme, sage, or both (reserving some for garnish)
½ cup panko

 

Preheat oven to 400°F

Cut the acorn squash horizontally (against the ridges rather than with them), you get lovely scalloped edges that are as pretty as a picture. Drizzle the squash with the olive oil and sprinkle salt and pepper, and roast until they’re soft (about 20 minutes.)

Heat the butter in a skillet, add the garlic and herbs. When fragrant, toss in the panko. As you stir, the panko will toast and absorb those fall flavors. Sprinkle the panko atop the plated squash, garnish with fresh herbs and enjoy.


We’ve got our eye on you! Hibiscus Margarita

Spooky eyeball Hibiscus Margarita Recipe

Trick or Treat!

Freak out with this fun cocktail, made blood red with a delicious hibiscus simple syrup. We love using hibiscus because its delicious sour flavor enhances the margarita (no need for limes) and is packed with Vitamin C! A lychee stuffed with an Amarena cherry, speared with a rosemary skewer makes for a creepy cocktail indeed.

Hibiscus Simple Syrup

makes 2 cups

2 cups water
2 cups sugar
½ cup dried hibiscus flowers (available at all Mexican markets, or online)

 

Bring the ingredients to a rolling boil, then simmer for about 5-10 minutes. Taste it. The sweetness in the cocktail comes from the simple syrup, so it should be sweet — but not too sweet! Strain the simple syrup and allow to cool completely before using. Any extra keeps in your fridge for almost forever.

 

Hibiscus Margarita

makes 1 cocktail, or many!

2 parts hibiscus simple syrup (use about 2 ounces per cocktail)
3 parts Mezcal tequila  (use 3 ounces per cocktail)
blueberry sea salt, for the rim of the cocktail (see here for the Hipcooks recipe)
Amarena-stuffed lychees & rosemary skewers, if desired

 

Prepare a rocks glass by running a lime around the rim and coating it with the blueberry salt. Fill the glass with ice — or be fancy like us and use one king cube.

Plop all the ingredients (minus the garnish) into a cocktail shaker with plenty of ice and shake, shake, shake your moneymaker. The more you shake, the yummier the drink. Using the strainer, pour the cocktail into the prepared glass. Garnish with freakiness, and enjoy.


Spicy Epazote Margarita

Halloween Recipe: Epazote Margarita Recipe

This margarita es muy bueno, and perfect for your Halloween/Day of the Dead Celebrations. If you don’t have plans yet for Day of the Dead, be sure to join us at Hipcooks for our amazing supperclub class, complete with an altar, candles and an all-Mexican menu with a Mole to die for (bwah ha ha)!

An herbaceous and spicy simple syrup gives this margarita its kick. The herb we use is a Mexican herb called epazote. The flavor is unique — a bit like basil and cilantro combined. If you’ve had an authentic albondigas soup before, you’ll recognize it! You can find epazote fresh in Mexican markets, and they’ll always have a dried version. Both are fine to use in the simply syrup…or just use basil if that’s what you have to hand.

The purple salt rim gives this drink an extra bit of specialness…we went for sweet and salty to compliment the flavors of the margarita. Find the recipe for the salt below.

Epazote & Chile Simple Syrup

makes 2 cups

1 cup water
1 cup sugar
3 tablespoons dried epazote, or 8 leaves fresh
1 jalapeno chile pepper, halved

Bring the ingredients to a rolling boil, then simmer for about 5-10 minutes until your kitchen smells great. Strain the simple syrup and allow to cool completely before using. Any extra keeps in your fridge for almost forever.

 

Spicy Epazote Margarita

makes 1 cocktail, or many!

1 part freshly squeezed lime juice (use about 1 ounce per cocktail)
3 parts agave tequila  (use 3 ounces per cocktail)
1 part epazote & chile simple syrup (see recipe above)
peeled cucumber, for garnish
blueberry sea salt, for garnish (see recipe below), or substitute regular salt

 

Prepare a rocks glass by running a lime around the rim and coating it with the blueberry salt. Or, paint a section of the glass with lime, and sprinkle with salt. (The salt will only adhere to where you have the lime.) Fill the glass with ice.

Plop all the ingredients (minus the garnish) into a cocktail shaker with plenty of ice and shake, shake, shake your moneymaker. The more you shake, the yummier the drink. Using the strainer, pour the cocktail into the prepared glass. Garnish with a rolled cucumber peel for beauty points.

Blueberry Sea Salt

1 cup coarse sea salt
1/2 cup freeze-dried blueberries
Maldon Salt, to finish

 

In a food processor or blender, whizz the freeze-dried blueberries with the coarse salt until it turns a delightful purple. For delicious flakes, mix in some Maldon sea salt at the end. You’ll enjoy this process so much, you’ll soon be making all kinds of flavored sea salts (lemon and thyme, chile & cumin) and sharing them with your friends, as delightful little gifts in our sweet little salt cellars.

BlueBerry Salt Recipe for Margaritas


Blood-red Cherry Margarita

Only a 2 weeks until Halloween & Day of the Dead, so you better practice your margarita-making. Here is another version that’s creepy and so delicious!

Halloween Recipe: Cherry Margarita

The pizazz in this margarita comes from Amarena cherries and a dash of their syrup. Trader Joes sells these at a great price. Use a dash of the syrup to sweeten the margarita — if you like it sweet, use more. The syrup also sinks beautifully into the cocktail if you prefer to serve a stirred (not shaken) version. A cherry looks cute on the rim of the glass, or plop inside.

We love the smoky taste of Mezcal tequila in this cocktail, but you can choose another if you wish. Black salt is fun to use for contrast!

Blood-red Cherry Margarita

makes 1 cocktail, or many!

1 part freshly squeezed lime juice (use about 1 ounce per cocktail)
3 parts Mezcal tequila  (use 3 ounces per cocktail)
A dash of Cherry bitters (if desired)
Amarena cherry syrup, to taste (see note above)
Amarena cherry, for garnish (see note above)
Black sea salt, for garnish

 

Prepare a cocktail glass by running a lime around the rim and coating it with the black salt.

Plop all the ingredients (minus the garnish) into a cocktail shaker with plenty of ice and shake, shake, shake your moneymaker. The more you shake, the yummier the drink. Using the strainer, pour the cocktail into the prepared glass.

Halloween Recipe: Cherry Margarita

 


Creepy cocktail kickoff! Persimmon Margarita

Creepy Cocktail season is here! We’re kicking it off with this delightfully sweet & sour Persimmon Margarita with a spiced simple syrup and smoked salt rim.

Persimmon Margarita Recipe by Hipcooks

You can add pizazz to any margarita with a flavored simple syrup. What’s a simple syrup? It’s equal parts sugar and water, boiled until the sugar is fully dissolved and completely suspended in the water. Whenever you have a cocktail that is too sour or too strong, a dash of simple can balance it out. At Hipcooks, we’re not so simple with our syrup (ha ha) — we take the extra opportunity when making it to infuse flavor! Be it herbs, spices, or even chilies: boiling the sugar and water with other stuff is the way to go!

Warm-spiced Simple Syrup

makes 2 cups

1 cup water
1 cup sugar
2 cinnamon sticks
1/2-inch piece ginger, sliced
A generous peel of lemon
a few Microplane’s passings-worth of nutmeg
4 cloves
4-6 cardamom pods, smashed

 

Bring the water, sugar and spices to a rolling boil, then simmer for about 5-10 minutes until your kitchen smells great. Strain the simple syrup and allow to cool completely before using. Any extra keeps in your fridge for almost forever. Extra uses of this simple syrup (as if cocktails aren’t enough), would be to mix into your coffee or to drizzle on vanilla ice cream or pancakes instead of syrup.

Halloween Adult Drink: Persimmon Margarita Recipe

Making the cocktail, once you have the simple syrup, is easy breezy. If you’re extra-lazy, you can make the cocktail without the persimmon puree, and just plop in a persimmon slice as an edible garnish. The drink will still be super-delicious (we tried it and concur!)

To make the persimmon puree, you’ll need a nicely ripened persimmon. (The soft Hachiya variety is perfect for this. Beware! This varietal is very astringent until it is super-soft. The flesh should be pudding-like). Cut in half, scoop out the flesh, and pop into a blender to whizz. If you need more liquid, you can add simple syrup. If you are using persimmon slices to garnish, ripened Fuyu persimmons are the ones you want. They don’t get too soft as they ripen, and make the perfect garnish.

Persimmon Margarita

makes 1 cocktail, or many!

1 part freshly squeezed lime juice (use about 1 ounce per cocktail)
3 parts agave tequila  (use 3 ounces per cocktail)
1 part warm-spiced simple syrup (see recipe above)
persimmon puree, to taste (see note above)
persimmon slices, for garnish (see note above)
Maldon smoked sea salt, for garnish

 

Prepare a rocks glass by running a lime around the rim and coating it with the flake salt. Fill the glass with ice.

Plop all the ingredients (minus the garnish) into a cocktail shaker with plenty of ice and shake, shake, shake your moneymaker. The more you shake, the yummier the drink. Using the strainer, pour the cocktail into the prepared glass. Slide a persimmon slice on the edge of the glass for beauty points.


Back-from-school Pinwheel Bread

I’m doing it again! I’m sharing another of my Mamma’s most popular recipes. You guys are so lucky to get this — and you must make it! My mother’s recipe is totally “Hipcooks,” meaning that it’s a snap to make, yet so special and delicious that everyone will be fawning over it (and you!) when it comes out of the oven, smelling sweetly of cinnamon and walnuts.  You won’t believe it, but this bread is no-knead, and no-fuss. A child can make it (and does)!

The last time I made this recipe I was Lucia’s age. How fun it was to re-discover this delicious bread with her.

Basically, you plop warmed milk, butter, yeast (from a  packet) some sugar for the yeast to eat into a mixer, and add egg and flour. Mix until just combined.

Cover, and throw the whole thing into the fridge for a minimum of 2 hours or a maximum of 3 days. True! The bread does not care! It will prove (rise) just the same.

Roll it out.

German Yeast Bread Recipe by Hipcooks

Back-from-school Pinwheel BreadSprinkle  the dough with brown sugar, plenty of cinnamon, golden raisins and chopped walnuts. Roll it into one big log, and transfer to a baking sheet. You can give it a horse-shoe shape, a circle, or a heart (credit to my daughter Lucia for best idea ever).

German Yeast Bread Recipe by Hipcooks

This bread will rise further in the oven, brown on top and smell like home.

Do not resist the temptation to cut a piece straight away, slather with superfluous butter and go straight to 7th Heaven.

Back-from-school Pinwheel Bread by Hipcooks

Without further ado…

My Mom’s “Hefeteig” – Pinwheel Bread

Makes one fabulous loaf, great for sharing.

1 package yeast (like Fliechmann’s)
¼ cup lukewarm water
1 cup milk
½ cup sugar
1 teaspoon salt
½ cup butter (1 stick) + ¼ cup butter for brushing (1/2 a stick or so).
4 cups flour
1 egg
4 tablespoons cinnamon (at least!), have fun judging the amount yourself
1 cup chopped walnuts  (at least!), see above
1 cup golden raisins (at least!), like before
½ cup brown sugar (at least!), you’re getting the hang of this!

 

Stir the yeast and warm water together. Scald the milk, and mix in the sugar and salt. Remove the milk from the heat and add 1 stick of butter. Once the butter has melted, check the temperature of the mixture. (Adding cold butter to the milk will both melt the butter while bringing down the temperature of the milk to just lukewarm, which is what you want. The Goldilocks Principle applies: too hot will kill the yeast, too cold and it will not activate.

Once the milk mixture is lukewarm, add it to a mixing bowl along with the yeast. (A stand mixer bowl is the easiest method, but you can mix by hand as well.)

Add 2 cups of flour, mix, add the egg, mix, and then the rest of the flour. The dough will be sticky — that’s fine! Cover the bowl and let the dough rest and prove in the fridge. (Minimum, 2 hours. Maximum, 3 days. Hint to the parents out there: make the dough in the evening, and then roll out the dough the next day with your kiddo.)

Preheat oven to 350°F.

Turn the raised dough (it will smell delicious already!) onto a floured surface. Roll out as thin as you dare…go for baking sheet size (about a foot by a foot and a half, if you’re a measurer.)

Brush the entire surface of the dough with melted butter. Sprinkle with brown sugar, copious amounts of cinnamon, golden raisins (yes!) and chopped walnuts. Use as much or as little as you like. Roll away! Shape the loaf as you please, and brush the top with butter.

Bake until the loaf is evenly browned and smelling fantastic, about 30 -40 unites depending on the size and shape you have. (It may rise a little in the process, don’t worry either way.) Remove from oven and enjoy immediately (who can resist!) Only superheroes and other very cool individuals are fearless about applying extra butter to each delicious slice.

 


Fig, Goat cheese & Proscuitto Bruschetta

Our first post highlighted the friendship between figs, Gorgonzola, Bacon & Rosemary. But Figs are a popular bunch. They also love to hang out with goat cheese, prosciutto and balsamic. This recipe makes the perfect snack to enjoy while you sip on wine and make dinner. (And our trusty toaster oven strikes again!)

Cocktails 3: Fig Brushetta

6 slices sourdough bread (rosemary sourdough is awesome, or whichever type of bread you fancy)
1 to 2 cloves garlic, peeled
extra virgin olive oil
16 ounces prosciutto, sliced
1 pound fresh figs (if fresh figs are not available, can use peaches), trimmed and quartered
8 ounces goat cheese
chopped rosemary or parsley to garnish (optional)
Balsamic reduction to garnish (optional)

 

Preheat your oven to 375

Slice the bread to 1/3 to 1/4 inch-thick and pop in the oven to toast. Remove, and rub a garlic clove across the top, just two or three times. (Bring the bread to your nose – see why you did that? Yum!)

Drizzle each toast ever so lightly with the olive oil and add a slice or two of prosciutto on top (we like to tear the prosciutto into smaller pieces). Plop the fig quarters on top of the prosciutto. Dot lovingly with goat cheese.

Switch the oven to broil, and put the toasts on to a baking sheet. Broil for a minute or two melt and brown the cheese.

Putting balsmic reduction on Fig BrushettaPut on a plate, sprinkle with chopped rosemary, drizzle with a little more olive oil – a light touch! The balsamic reduction also looks and tastes great.

Fig Brushetta Recipe by Hipcooks


Fig Tart with polenta crust & lemon mascarpone cream

Hunting on the world wide web led me to this great fig recipe on Epicurious. I’ve made it for years, and love it. So, for a change, here’s the recipe (first published in Gourmet in 2003). The pictures are Hipcooks. The only tweaks I’ve made to the recipe itself is to sub vanilla bean paste (just a drizzle), to the mascarpone cream instead of sugar. It’s a winner!

Fig Tart Recipe Fig Tart with polenta crust & lemon mascarpone cream how to. Fig Tart with polenta crust & lemon mascarpone cream Fig Tart with polenta crust & lemon mascarpone cream Recipe Fig Tart with polenta crust & lemon mascarpone cream recipe

 


Baked figs with mascarpone & cinnamon

Baked figs with mascarpone & cinnamon recipe

As “Fig Week” marches on, we’ve got another easy fig recipe for you. It’s a luscious dessert (that doubles as a naughty breakfast) and is a snap to make. Once again, we deploy our trusty hard-working toaster oven.

Preheat the toaster oven (or regular if that’s what you’ve got) to 400°F.

Slice figs in half (in quarters if they’re big) and put into a baking dish. Top with spoonfuls of mascarpone. Once you’ve dolloped to your heart’ts content, add a dash of freshly zested lemon, a swirl of vanilla bean paste and a dusting of cinnamon.

This will bake fast — give it ten minutes or so. You want the mascarpone to just begin to break, as the fat starts to separate out of the cheese. Just enough, and you’ll have lovely golden-colored beading on the melting mascarpone, and the figs will be warm. Serve without further ceremony or adornment, as this dish has all it (and you) need.

Baked figs with mascarpone & cinnamon recipe


Roasted gorgonzola stuffed figs, wrapped in bacon

 

The fig-monkeys strike again! We’ve got a basket full of figs and a week of posting fig recipes for this fabulous bumper-crop.

what to use for Bacon Wrapped Fig Recipe

Figs, please meet your new friends: Gorgonzola, rosemary, and bacon. We have a feeling you’ll all get along just fine.

Divet the figs for the proper introduction of Cheese. Cut the rosemary springs on the bias so that they make a nice sharp skewer. Strip the lower leaves from each rosemary spring by running your fingers down toward the cut end.

Bacon Wrapped Fig Recipe with rosemary

Once the figs are stuffed, wrap in them in bacon and secure each slice with the skewer.

Bacon Wrapped Fig Recipe with rosemary on tray

We baked right on in the toaster oven, on the “whole-y” tray, so that the bacon fat would drip down through the holes. 450°F will do it, for about 15 minutes until the bacon cooks all the way through.

Messy to eat? Guaranteed! Serve on a plate with a fork and knife, or place in a nest of arugula as a dressed-up salad.

 

kids collecting figs from fig tree.


Back-from-school Apple Cake

I’m doing it! I’m sharing my Mamma’s Apple Cake recipe, the one she learned growing up in Germany. In my family, we all make this cake so much, as it is so versatile. I know the recipe like the back of my hand. We’ve made some changes over the years, like substituting the white flour for almond flour. Why add the empty calories when you can add protein-rich almonds? Besides, it makes the cake much more moist and flavorful. Also, we cut down the sugar. Waaay. And swapped white for brown sugar, because not only is it healthier, the apples like it better. Is ¼ cup of sugar in an entire cake too little for you? We think it’s perfect, but up it if you like.

Lucia eating Apple Cake

Start this cake with your favorite apples. It’s the season! For us, the tarter the better. We choose Pink Lady or Green Apples, but there are so many varietals that will work. Another key adaptation of this traditional recipe — leave the apple skins on. They look pretty, have key nutrients, give the cake a great texture, plus you don’t have to peel apples. We call that a 4-point win! Just core and slice the apples in a pretty fashion (in half, in half again, and one more time make even eighths).

Apple Cake Recipe by Hipcooks

Key to the success and texture of the cake is to cream the butter and sugar well. Stand mixers are bomb.com. Be patient, scrape down the sides of the bowl a few times, and get that butter nice and fluffy. The rest of the cake assembles super-fast, so take your time with this step (only).

Apple Cake Recipe

The most wonderful thing about the artisan cake is that it needs no layering, frosting or any of that faff. A sprinkle of powdered sugar on the top and you’ve got a mouth-watering treat, especially if you serve it still warm from the oven. A dollop of whipped cream takes it over the top, you should go for it. And a nice cup of tea.

Sometimes I don’t want a whole cake sitting around our household of 2 — I’ll end up eating the whole thing. So I third the recipe and use a small cake pan. It fits in the toaster oven, so I just bake in there. And then my little cutie has a super-cute after school treat! (With a small slice for me, done and done.)

Apple Cake Recipe from Hipcooks

My Mom’s Apple Cake

makes one 8-inch cake

1 stick butter
¼ cup brown sugar
3 eggs
1 cup almond flour
½ teaspoon baking soda
½ teaspoon baking powder
¼ teaspoon salt
1 tablespoon cinnamon
3 your favorite apples, cored and sliced into 8ths
a sprinkling of sliced almonds (or walnuts), if desired

 

Preheat the oven to 350°F & line an 8-inch cake pan bottom with parchment.

Cream together the butter and sugar using a stand mixer or eggbeaters, until the butter is light and fluffy, at least 5 minutes. Mix together the flour, baking soda and powder, salt, and cinnamon. Crack the eggs into a small bowl or jug and lightly beat.

Add the egg mixture and the flour mixture to the creamed butter and sugar in 2 stages: first, add about half the eggs and mix until incorporated, then half of the flour and mix. Repeat.

Put the cake batter into the prepared pan, and top with sliced apples. The batter will rise and spread, “nesting” the apples in the cake. Scatter the top with nuts and pop in the oven for about 30 minutes, until the top is nicely browned and the edges are beginning to pull away from the sides of the pan.

Allow the cake to cool (even just slightly!) before serving with a sprinkling of powdered sugar and a dollop of whipped cream, sweetened with vanilla bean paste, powdered sugar and a splash of booze (either cognac, brandy, whiskey — all work a charm).

Apple Cake Recipe from Hipcooks


Check out the NEW Hipcooks Website!

Hipcooks Link
Our New Website is up!
Your new My Hipcooks account
Our new Class Schedule! page
Our Recipe page!!
Our new Resources page!
CHEERS! LET’S CELEBRATE A WHOLE NEW LOOK.

Cheers! Get Recipe
Monika Reti owner of Hipcooks
Hop onto the new site! We hope you enjoy it!
It’s been a mountain of a project. I’d love your enthusiastic feedback & suggestions.

Eat well, Be well,
Monika


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