INDIA month: stocking the spice cabinet

It’s March! Let’s go in like a lion, and heat things up around here!

We have so many great Indian recipes, we need 2 classes to cover everything. All Hipcooks studios are offering Indian classes all month long, so come on down and let’s spice things up.

Speaking of getting spicy around here, let’s talk about that spice drawer of yours. We bet it’s time for a little Spring Cleaning in there. Did you know that spices, especially those in powdered form, lose their luster over time? If you’ve got stuff in there that’s more than a few years old, they won’t spark joy, let alone flavor. Give that drawer an overhaul! And as you replace spices, buy the whole seeds and pods, rather than the powders. They’ll last longer, and taste better. For instance, buy cumin seeds rather than ground cumin. Any Hipcook worth their salt knows that toasting cumin seeds in a dry pan, and then fresh grinding them with a mortar and pestle will knock it out of the park. Try it with the coriander seeds as well… it’s much more impactful.

Of course, almost all Indian food starts with onions. Copious onions! In India, the consumer price index is tied to the price of onions, they are that important. Garlic, too. But once you’ve got those veggies simmering, you should Bollywood that skillet with some of these beauties:

The Dancing spices:

Coriander seeds: These are the seed pods from the cilantro plant. It must be toasted and fresh ground for you to really experience the fabulousness. While it is used in many Indian dishes, you’ll love it sprinkled over fresh hummus, and over meat and fish.

Cumin seeds: You know these guys from Mexican dishes. Often they’re tossed into black beans and chili. They’re also used all over Indian recipes. Both these and coriander seeds add a lot of flavor, without adding heat.

Cayenne: is when you want to spice things up! If you find that your dish doesn’t pack the punch you’re looking for (from the fresh chili, ginger, and garlic), then you can add a little chili powder (in this case, we have cayenne) to build a roaring fire.

Tumeric will turn everything a vibrant yellow and has a wonderful earthy,  carrot-y flavor. It’s a powerful anti-inflammatory, and great for your health!

Mustard seeds are so fun to pop in the pan! They have a mild flavor and are great for pickling, too!

Paprika gives an earthy, smoky pepper flavor without the heat.

The Warming Spices:

Cinnamon is really best when used whole. You can grate it with a Microplane, or pop in into a stew to release its wonderful sweet-tasting spice

Black peppercorns, of course, are a staple in any kitchen. Fill your peppermills so you can always use freshly ground. In many Indian dishes, you’ll toast it first for that extra love. You’ll also notice it’s flavor from Chinese cusine, as well as it’s role in stocks for Pho.

Star Anise should be used sparingly because it is strong, but it’s fantastic in simple syrups and to flavor basmati rice. It’s so pretty, how can you resist it?

Cloves are wonderful and warming — add a few to simmering water for tea.

Cardamom is delicious in Chai tea, and in coffee as well. Open a few pods, remove the small black spice inside and give them a little bash in the mortar and pestle. Add to your ground coffee beans and you’ll have a very deliciously spiced coffee, with no extra calories.

We’ll be posting recipes all month that use these fantastic spices, so you’ll be sure to get well-acquainted with them. Turn up the heat, and we’ll see you next week with recipe posts.


We’ve still got love for you!

How to make fat bombs, keto recipe

Keto is all the rage right now, and these super-tasty fat bombs are luscious little snacks. Whether you’re experimenting with a ketogenic diet or just looking to incorporate more healthy fats into your diet, these little heartthrobs will tide you over to the next meal. They’re not sweet, but the richness is so satisfying!

Speaking of love, we’ve got the love for Nutiva organic coconut oil. Here, we use regular coconut oil for the delicious flavor it gives these little cute lemony treats. No sweetener necessary, because of the natural lusciousness of the coconut. When we’re cooking at high temps, or when we don’t want the flavor profile of the coconut (if we’re searing scallops, for example), we’ll choose Nutiva’s refined coconut oil — organic, high smoke point, and flavorless.

4 ½ ounces butter
2 ounces coconut oil
zest and juice of 3 lemons
3 thyme sprigs, leaves removed from the stem
4½ ounces coconut flakes (make sure it is unsweetened coconut)
Maldon flake salt
you’ll also need a high-speed blender, like a Vitamix and silicone ice-cube trays, like these or the kind you see at IKEA.

 

Melt the coconut oil and butter over low heat until both are just warmed through (and melted). Remove from heat, and add the lemon zest and juice, and just a few thyme leaves.

Place the coconut flakes in the blender and add the oil mixture. Whiz on high speed until smooth.

Get out the silicone ice trays, and line them with a thyme leaf or two, and a sprinkle of the Maldon salt. Pour in the mixture from the blender, until they are about half-filled. Chill in the fridge. Serve cold, as these cuties will “melt their hearts” at room temperature!


By popular demand! Chicken liver pâté

Thanks, everyone, for your lovely response to Cheese Board #2. Since many of you were inspired by the pâté, here’s a detailed recipe with photos. Let us know how it turns out!

Love, Hipcooks


serves 6 -8

8 tablespoons butter
3-5 shallots (or a large red onion), sliced
1 garlic clove, sliced
1 pound chicken livers, drained
1 cup port wine, cognac or brandy
4-6 tablespoons cream
4 sprigs of fresh thyme
zest of 1 lemon
you’ll also need crostini, bread or crackers for serving

 

Chicken livers are available frozen at many grocery stores – we find organic ones in the freezer section of Whole Foods. Once you master this recipe, you won’t be afraid to experiment with other types of liver (like duck) or other herbs and flavorings (like duck liver with sage and orange zest, with cognac.)

How to make Chicken liver pâté

Melt one tablespoon of butter in a skillet over medium heat. Add the shallot and garlic and allow them to soften as you stir, about 3 -5 minutes. Add the chicken livers and continue cooking until the livers are just cooked through, about 4-5 minutes. Add salt and pepper.

How to make Chicken liver pâté

Next, deglaze the pan with the port and allow it to reduce almost completely.

How to make Chicken liver pâté

Transfer the ingredients to a high-speed blender or food processor, and whiz away. A plop of cream, while not necessary, brings an extra level of decadence and richness, so go for it! Give the pâté a taste, you’ll most likely find that more salt and pepper are needed.

How to make Chicken liver pâté

Transfer the pâté to its serving vessel.

In a small pot or pan, melt the remaining butter. You can clarify it if you like, by skimming off the solids that appear at the top. (We usually don’t bother.) Add the thyme and lemon zest, allowing them to infuse the melted butter, then pour it on top of the pâté. Not only does this create a delicious butter (to be smeared with the pâté on your crostini), but it protects the pâté from drying out and discoloring in the fridge.

Transfer the pâté to the fridge to set, it will need at least several hours (or overnight). Bring to room temperature before serving (about 20 minutes out of the fridge).


Say “I love you more” with the Don Juan of Cheese boards

Whisk your Sweetie to Spain with this cheese board. It’s all romance for these whimsical cheeses, set against a backdrop of orange and pale green. Homemade dulce de membrillo, or quince paste, beckons like a matador to the manchego. The marcona almonds Flamenco dance in the mouth, bursting with crunch and buttery flavor. Kumquats are shameless flirts, as each bite goes from sweet, to very sour, and back to sweet again.

We’re pouring on the cheese, aren’t we? And why not — it’s Valentine’s Week!

Cheese Board for Valentine's Day

Once again, in happy collaboration with the Cheese Bar in Portland, we bring you outstanding cheeses (and other whimsy) to help create an outstanding cheeseboard:

1605 Manchego (La Mancha, Spain). This quixotic cheese is the one that Cheesemonger Steve Jones has been looking for his entire career. And for good reason: this organic and natural-rinded raw sheep is so sublime. It’s made by a woman, named this cheese after the year Don Quixote was written (isn’t that so romantic?) We simply had to offer our dulce de membrillo as the match-made-in heaven.

Hyo de Quintana Mahon, raw cow (Mallorca, Spain) handmade, artisan Mahon cheese. We “fracture” this cheese into perfect nibbly bits.

Veigadarte (Leon, Spain)  This goat cheese is lemony & delicious. Each bite is a journey, from the firmer texture near the ash-encrusted rind to the gooier middle.

Spanish charcuterie Spanish chorizo and jamón serrano don this board, 2 great salty options among many choices.

Kumquats, olives, macarona almonds, and teeny brined peppers also kiss the cheese board, with complementary colors, textures, and flavors.

And, to take it over the top (who can resist), pop these cuties into your beloved’s mouth: Poached Apricots, stuffed with Fromage Blanc, sealed with chopped pistachios —an aphrodisiac worthy of Don Juan himself.

Cheese Board for Valentine's Day

 

 


Say “I love you!” with a Cheese board

Valentine’s day was made for Cheesiness, so why not embrace it and go all the way?

The perfect cheeseboard is a vision of beauty and pure deliciousness. You can get away with decadence — because it’s meant for nibbling … as you sip and canoodle with your schnookums. It’s all about the balance, Romeos.

Hipcooks, in collaboration with the Cheese Bar in Portland, show you How to create the Wow:

Pick cheeses that complement each other in texture and flavor. Let your cheesemonger (we had the fantastic owner Steve of the Cheese Bar) guide you with expert knowledge. The cheeses here range from ooey-gooey to complex, to sharp and tangy:

Start with the Briar Rose Phoebe, a spruce-bark wrapped wash-rind cows milk cheese from right here in Oregon (from Dundee)…sublime gets redefined with this superlative cheese.

Springbrook Farm’s Ashbrook, a raw cow’s milk cheese, has a layer of vegetable ash in the middle. This Vermont farm brings big city schoolkids to the farm to learn about farming.

Neal’s Yard Spaekennoe Red Leicester. London-based Neils’s Yard sources the best-of-the-best from the UK. This cheese is mature (aged over 1 year)  & made with raw cow’s milk.

Parmigiano Reggiano D.O.P. “The King of Cheeses! This should be on every cheese board,” says Steve.

Neal’s Yard Colston Bassette Stilton. “The best stilton in the world in my mind,” says our favorite cheesemonger.

Notice for some of the cheeses we give an “entry” point. Give a little guidance, like fracturing the red Leicester, crumbling some of the parmesan, slicing a little of the Springbrook Farm Ashbrook.

Play with color and texture. Romance is all about awakening the senses, so take full advantage of the opportunity, Casanovas! Here, we add crunchy nuts, douse the stilton in a sweet port-wine reduction, add pears & berries for a little pop and change of scenery. And just because we love you so much, we’re including recipes for homemade pate and roasted garlic so your board can have that little extra touch that says how much you care.

Cheese Board created by Hipcooks and Cheese Bar in Portland Oregon

Sublime roasted garlic

Let no garlic go to waste! When you’re in need of comfort food, this one really does the trick! Smear on toast and enjoy with creamy roasted tomato soup (we’ve got the best recipe for one in our Soup Class)

makes 1 luscious head of roasted garlic

1 head garlic
2 tablespoons(ish) of olive oil
a few sprigs of fresh thyme
You’ll also need little toasts, crostini or the perfect baguette

How to make Roasted Garlic Hipcooks

Using a large kitchen knife, trim the top off the garlic, so that all the cloves are exposed. Press down on the garlic (using your hand or the flat side of your knife), to loosen the cloves a bit. Pour in a bit of olive oil, and let it absorb into the space between the cloves. Repeat a couple of times, until about a tablespoon or two of olive oil has been used.

Sprinkle with salt, pepper, and thyme, and roast the garlic. We use our trusty little toaster oven for this, set to 375°F  for about 30 minutes until the garlic is soft and golden. Serve right away, sprinkled with more salt and pepper.

Chicken Liver Pâté

How to make Chicken liver pâté

serves 6 -8

8 tablespoons butter
3-5 shallots (or a large red onion), sliced
1 garlic clove, sliced
1 pound chicken livers, drained
1 cup port wine, cognac or brandy
4-6 tablespoons cream
4 sprigs of fresh thyme
zest of 1 lemon
you’ll also need crostini, bread or crackers for serving

 

Melt one tablespoon of butter in a skillet over medium heat. Add the shallot and garlic and allow them to soften as you stir, about 3 -5 minutes. Add the chicken livers and continue cooking until the livers are just cooked through, about 4-5 minutes. Add salt and pepper. Next, deglaze the pan with the port and allow it to reduce almost completely.

Transfer the ingredients to a high-speed blender or food processor, and whiz away. A plop of cream, while not necessary, brings an extra level of decadence and richness, so go for it! Give the pâté a taste, you’ll most likely find that more salt and pepper are needed.

Transfer the pâté to its serving vessel.

In a small pot or pan, melt the remaining butter. You can clarify it if you like, by skimming off the solids that appear at the top. (We usually don’t bother.) Add the thyme and lemon zest, allowing them to infuse the melted butter, then pour it on top of the pâté. Not only does this create a delicious butter (to be smeared with the pâté on your crostini), but it protects the pâté from drying out and discoloring in the fridge.

Transfer the pâté to the fridge to set, it will need at least several hours (or overnight). Bring to room temperature before serving (about 20 minutes out of the fridge).


Cheesy In February: Cheese Board #1

Hipcooks Cheese Board

Milk + Acid + Heat = Cheese!

The first Cheeseboard for February is one you can serve with all homemade cheeses! Our Cheese Whiz class will show you how.

Chevre: on the black plate in the picture above, we’ve got chevre made from goat’s milk. It’s creamy and mild (since this one is minimally aged). You can top with Maldon flake salt, lemon curls, and oregano, or you could roll into a log and encrust with pepper, sesame seeds, tapenade…your imagination’s the limit.

Fromage Fort: in the foreground in the picture above, we’ve got fromage fort smeared on crostini. A strong, spreadable cheese spiked with booze…it has all the great qualities of a fabulous fondue but in smearable form. You can’t buy this magical stuff anywhere…homemade only.

Homemade Mozzarella: in the bowl, in the picture above. You don’t know mozzarella until you’ve tried up-to-the-minute fresh. Talk about melt-in-the-mouth! Here, we serve in solitary splendor, with a drizzle of our finest olive oil, a sprinkle of baby basil and thyme leaves.

Fresh Ricotta: did you know you can make a luscious, creamy, fabulously fresh ricotta in minutes? Dress it with some sea salt and lemon zest and eat it with a spoon! You can serve it in cute roasted tomato cups, here’s a recipe to make them!

Roasted Tomatoes Recipe

makes 24 tomato halves, ready to stuff with fresh ricotta and mint, drizzle with olive oil and serve with goat cheese and olives, or a thousand other ideas you may have!

12 vine-ripened tomatoes
4-6 tablespoons olive oil
1 bunch fresh oregano, leaves removed (use dried if you don’t have fresh)
4 cloves garlic, sliced
Maldon Salt and pepper

 

Preheat your oven to 275°F.

Slice the tomatoes in half crosswise, and use a thin spoon to scoop out the seeds.

Place the tomato halves on a baking sheet, skin-side down. Drizzle with the olive oil and sprinkle with the oregano, garlic, Maldon salt, and fresh black pepper.

Roast in the oven about 2 hours, until shrunken. They’ll be packed with flavor!

These beauties will keep in the fridge in a sealed container for up to a week. Please bring up to room temperature before using.


A “Smooth” way to kick off the NY

Here’s a “smooth” way to kick off the New Year, with a healthy you! Smoothies can be a fantastic meal replacement when created thoughtfully: they should be satisfying, well-composed and (of course) super-scrumptious. Here’s a smoothie trifecta for you: choose one or make all 3!

Healthy Smoothies for the New Year

“The Cold-Buster”: Greens, Lemon & Ginger Smoothie

serves 1

4-6 stalks celery (for enzymes and antioxidants.  It’s high in folate, potassium, Vitamin B6, C, & K)
a small handful of parsley leaves (improves your immune system and digestion)
1 green apple, for sweetness (increases metabolism, Vitamin A & C)
1 thumb-sized piece of ginger, peeled (reduces nausea, pain, and inflammation)
juice of 1 lemon (Vitamin C!)
sprinkle of hemp seeds, optional (some healthy fat & protein)

The Cold Buster Smoothie Recipe

We call this smoothie “The Cold-Buster.” If you’re feeling like you need a pick-me-up, here it is in a glass!

Pop all your ingredients in your Vitamix, and add about 1 cup of water to start. Blend, using the tamper, to a nice consistency (add more water if you need to.) Taste, and adjust the sweetness (apple), spiciness (ginger) and sour (lemon) to taste. Although celery is known to have sodium, it is also super-nice to add a sprinkling of sea salt.

Because we love to garnish the smoothie, we add hemp to the top. Also, it is satisfying to “chew” on a sip…it makes us feel like we’re having a meal. If you like a “smooth smoothie,” then leave them out.

 

“The Vitamin C Bomb”: Orange, Fig & Coconut Smoothie

 serves 1

2 whole organic oranges (yep! Skin-on for Vitamin C!)
4-6 figs (for sweetness). You can use fresh, frozen or dried
juice of 1 -or 2 lemons (more Vitamin C!)
2 tablespoons coconut oil (everyone needs some healthy fat)
sprinkle of chia seeds, optional (for fat, antioxidants, protein, and appetite control)

We call this smoothie “The Vitamin C Bomb.” If you’re feeling like you need an inoculation of good health, here it is in a glass!

Pop all your ingredients in your Vitamix, and add about 1 cup of water to start. Blend, using the tamper, to a nice consistency (add more water if you need to.) Taste, and adjust the sweetness (fig), richness (coconut oil) and sour (lemon) to taste.

Because we love to garnish the smoothie, we add chia seeds to the top. Also, it is satisfying to “chew” on a sip…it makes us feel like we’re having a meal. If you like a “smooth smoothie,” then leave them out.

 

“The Cravings-Crasher”: Chai Spice “Latte” Smoothie

serves 1

2 cups almond or cashew milk
4-6 dried Medjool dates (pits removed)
1 thumb-sized piece of ginger, peeled
1 teaspoon ground cinnamon
1 teaspoon ground cardamom
¼ teaspoon ground clove
¼ teaspoon star anise, optional (you can use ground, or smash in a mortar and pestle)
¼ teaspoon ground ginger
a few twists freshly ground black pepper
1 teaspoon vanilla bean paste
sprinkle of freshly toasted coconut for garnish, optional

 

Rich with healthy fats, protein and warming spices, this satisfying smoothie will knock your cravings outta the park!

We like to make our own fresh nut milk. Would you like to see a tutorial on that? Comment below! Also, we use whole spices, since we prefer to first toast and then grind them for optimal freshness & flavor. Using ground spices (as long as they are not too long in the tooth) is fine in this case since you probably want to make a quick smoothie without much fuss. For those who love an olfactory kitchen and have the time, freshly toast and grind your own. (We sure did!)

Add the nut milk, dates, and fresh ginger to the Vitamix. Blend, using the tamper, to a nice consistency and add the spices. Taste, and adjust the sweetness (dates) and richness (add some coconut oil for extra creaminess). Is it cold outside, or are you needing something warm? The lovely thing about the Vitamix is that you can blend on high speed for a few minutes, and the friction of the blades will warm the drink. Lovely, warm, frothy lusciousness — yes, please!

Wanna take this over the top (and add a hint of sweetness without sugar)? Then sprinkle toasted coconut flakes on top. You’ll be glad you did!


Hipcooks’ New Year’s Resolution

In 2019, we’ll keep the Real Food flowing with a new class each month, with fun themes and great new menus to keep you happy in the kitchen all year long.

New Hipcooks Cooking Classes for 2019January: The Surprise Guest
A class that teaches what you should you keep in your kitchen to be a Hipcook, always ready to make something amazing out of (seemly) nothing.

February: The Cheese Whiz
Come & learn to make cheese, cheese, glorious cheese at this Hipcooks Workshop!

March : India, LTD
Perfect for vegetarians who love Indian food

April: I’m free!
Here are protein-rich, satisfying meals that are gluten & dairy-free.

May: Badda-Bing
An adventurous menu featuring modern Italian cooking.

June: A Moveable Feast
It’s summertime outdoor concert season — be a hero at the picnic! It’s too hot to eat hot food! Delight your beloveds with this gorgeous summer menu.

July: Midsummer Night’s Dream
It’s too hot to eat hot food! Delight your beloveds with this gorgeous summer menu.

August:
Vietnamese or Lebanese? We can’t decide which (or both?) Help us decide please.  COMMENT BELOW! 

September: Cooking 101
Beginner cooks, quick-cooking for singles, small families, & people on-the-go: this class is perfect for all of you

October: Oktoberfest!
As if we need an excuse for sausages & beer! Here’s a delicious German menu paired with fine wine.

November: Veni, Vidi, Vici!
The Osso-yummiest of Italian classes! A meal you cannot refuse!

December: ?
What would you like to see at Hipcooks? We’ve left this open for you to chime in and please comment below, we’d love to hear from you!


A New Year’s Resolution for You!

Make a Promise to yourself that you can honor the whole year. Enjoy wonderful energy & great health when you eat nothing processed. Real Food Only!

Make it a Year of Abundance
, not of sacrifice. When you eliminate all processed foods, reward yourself by enjoying all real foods – yep, that includes butter, cream, cacao, salt, sugar & wine. Be a guiltless omnivore!

If you can’t pronounce it, don’t eat it! In fact, make it simpler on yourself by not purchasing anything that needs a label. Instead, enjoy ingredients of the best quality, because you, my dear, are worth it!

Shop the perimeter
(only) of the grocery store, enjoy Farmer’s Markets, and let Hipcooks give you confidence & inspiration to keep cooking! If you’re a person on the go, we’ll help you with simple, delicious recipes with just a few ingredients. We’ll spice things up for your culinary adventurers who love to spend time in the kitchen.

1st Day of Hipcooks

Quince Fruit on a table

On the 1st day of Hipcooks, my true love gave to me…

Quince!

Quince are a magical fruit. A mix between an apple and a pear, yet they are so astringent they must be cooked to enjoy. And enjoy you will.

The next days of Hipcooks will feature quince recipes you’ll love. However, on Day 1, your first task is simply to buy some quince. Put them somewhere prominently, where you can enjoy their exquisite, charming lopsided beauty. On your table, on your mantel, in a bowl in the kitchen…wherever, you put them, you’ll be glad you did. Soon your room will be smelling like apple pie. There is no other fruit so aromatic! (Well, maybe a durian, but that is altogether different.)

Even if all you do is buy the quince and enjoy their perfume and beauty, you’ll be glad you did.


2nd day of Hipcooks | How to Poach Quince

Grab those quince and being cooking, Hipcook!

How to Poach Quince

As you know, quince has to be cooked to enjoy, so today’s task is to get poaching, Quincy Jones. Use a u-shaped peeler to peel the fruit. Using a sturdy knife, cut the quince in half. Cut some into segments and remove the core, but leave some just as they are. How to poach quince depends on what recipes I make, I like to have some of each type.

How to Poach Quince

Get a large pot ready with water (start with about 2 cups), the juice of 2 lemons (and the squeezed lemons themselves), 4 cinnamon sticks, a scattering of cloves and cardamon pods, a sprinkling of star anise, and a vanilla pod, split lengthwise and teased open with the tip of a paring knife. Stir in 2 cups of sugar.

How to Poach Quince

Bring the pot to a boil, reduce to a simmer and poach away. The room will smell fantastic in short order. The holidays are here! Take big breaths, deeply. Inhale through the nose and out through your mouth. You’re gonna make it through this one, and it will be awesome.

How to Poach Quince

Your quinces are done when they have turned a wonderful orange, and are tender. When cool, store in a covered container in the fridge, immersed in all that poaching liquid. You’ll use both for the recipes that follow. (Quince can be stored this way for up to 10 days.)


3rd day of Hipcooks | Poached Quince for Dessert

On the 3rd Day of Hipcooks, I paused everything and enjoyed a dessert of poached quince. As my own reward. For poaching all those quinces, and getting ahead of the game. And they’re poached already… so I can make this in minutes.

Poached Quince Recipe

Scoop about ½ cup of the quince poaching liquid into a small pot and bring to a boil. Allow the liquid to reduce by about half, turn down the heat and then add two quince halves. Let the quince warm in this liquid, and then serve. Enjoy on its own and on your own, or with a plop of honey yogurt or ice cream. You deserve it!


4th Day of Hipcooks: Cookbook Deal

Hipcooks Cook Book Sale December 2018

Travel the world with Hipcooks! Think of this as 12 Hipcooks classes, all rolled into 1 cookbook with dazzling photos. This deal is in-store / after class only, so pick up a cookbook and we’ll give you a second for free!


5th day of Hipcooks: Tagine-Inspired Lamb with Quince

How to make Lamb with Quince

Fragrant spices, fruit, and pomegranate molasses cut through the richness of the lamb, resulting in a dish that is a wondrous balance of sweet, spicy and sour flavors. Serve it with couscous for a memorable holiday dinner.

You can cook this dinner on the stovetop, in the oven or even in a slow-cooker. All will produce a lamb that will be fragrant and meltingly tender.

Tagine-Inspired Lamb with Quince

serves 4

3½ pounds of lamb (rack or leg, bone-in)
2 tablespoons butter
3 garlic cloves, crushed
2 large onions, diced
2 tablespoons tomato paste
½ teaspoon cayenne
½ teaspoon paprika
½teaspoon freshly ground black pepper
1 tablespoon cinnamon
1 tablespoon allspice
1 teaspoon salt
1½ tablespoon pomegranate molasses
poached quince slices from about 2 poached quince (see recipe above)

 

Trim the lamb of any excess fat. Melt the butter over medium heat in a large, heavy-bottomed skillet.  Brown the lamb all over. Remove the lamb and set aside.

Add the garlic and onions to the pan and cook for a few minutes. Then add the tomato paste and spices. Once all is fragrant, return the lamb to the pan, with just enough hot water to cover everything. Stir in the salt and pomegranate molasses and bring to a boil. Turn down the heat and simmer gently for 30 minutes.

Check on the lamb, turning if needed, and taste (and adjust) the seasonings to your liking, adding more spice if it is too mild, or pomegranate if it needs a touch more sweet and sour. Add the poached quince and cook a further 15 to 20 minutes.

When you are ready to serve, garnish with parsley.


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